Events


  • BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar –  Jibin Sadasivan and Reid Warsaba

    BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Jibin Sadasivan and Reid Warsaba

    Jibin Sadasivan Title: When proteins go viral: Investigation on how a viral protein impairs stress granule formation   Abstract: Stress granules (SG) are ribonucleoprotein aggregates that accumulate during cellular stress when translation is limited. Inhibition of SG assembly has been observed under virus infection across species, suggesting a conserved fundamental viral strategy. How this occurs and why […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Dr. Tom Hobman

    BMBDG Seminar: Dr. Tom Hobman

    Title:  Unraveling RNA virus-host interactions reveals novel antiviral targets. Professor. Department of Cell Biology. University of Alberta Abstract:     RNA virus infections impose huge economic and social burdens around the globe. Direct-acting antiviral therapeutics and vaccines can be highly effective in controlling epidemic and pandemic viruses, but these drugs/prophylactics take time to develop and their efficacy is […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar:  P.h.D Exit Seminar – Amy Strilchuk (Cancelled)

    BMBDG Seminar: P.h.D Exit Seminar – Amy Strilchuk (Cancelled)

    Title: Blood clot stability can be controlled using lipid nanoparticle-delivered siRNA Abstract: Disruptions in the balance of clot formation and degradation can lead to dangerous, potentially fatal, clotting or bleeding events. While a plethora of research tools and clinical therapies exist to control clot formation, options for controlling clot degradation are extremely limited. RNA and lipid-based technologies […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Dr. Roberto Chica

    BMBDG Seminar: Dr. Roberto Chica

    Title:  Ensemble-based computational design of enzyme catalysis and conformational equilibrium. Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences. University of Ottawa Abstract:     Enzymes are dynamic molecules, and this flexibility is essential to their catalytic function. Yet, computational enzyme design is typically performed using a single protein scaffold as design template, ignoring the important contributions of dynamics […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Karlton Scheu

    BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Karlton Scheu

    Title: Dissecting the biophysical properties and DNA-binding specificity of the ETV6 transcription factor Abstract: Transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences and regulate the expression of associated genes. In this thesis, I used several biophysical methods to investigate the structure and DNA-binding specificity profile of the eukaryotic transcription factor ETV6. I investigated the mechanisms by which ETV6 selectively […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Enoli de Silva

    BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Enoli de Silva

    Title: The role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating platelet lifespan and function  Abstract: Platelets are small discoid blood cells that regulate hemostasis and wound healing. Normal platelet function is largely contingent on the shape change reaction that occurs following the cells’ exposure to external stimuli and/or soluble agonists. Agonist-driven platelet shape change is mediated by reorganizations […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – John Chen

    BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – John Chen

    Title: Mutational scanning of metallo-β-lactamases to probe functional determinants, selection pressure dependence and homolog incompatibilities Abstract: Enzymes known as metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are a major source of bacterial resistance against β-lactams, one of the most widely used classes of clinical antibiotics. MBLs degrade almost all classes of β-lactams with high efficacy, and can be transmitted on plasmids. Detailed […] Read More


  • BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Bronwyn Lyons

    BMBDG Seminar: Ph.D. Exit Seminar – Bronwyn Lyons

    Posted on March 31, 2022 Title: Structural investigation of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli type 3 secretion system. Abstract: “Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is frequently a cause of diarrheal disease, stemming from produce contamination due to farm waste run-offs, and inadequate supply of clean water. Virulence mechanisms that these bacteria employ to cause disease are conserved across many pathogens, such as […] Read More